My Brother decided to reenact Adoniram Judson. He ask me to sew him an outfit styled after the regency area – which I happily agreed to do. Here are pictures of the completed outfit:

Finished 1930’s quilt.

This past weekend my cousin and I had the opportunity to finished a quilt that was begun in the 1930s. We purchased the quilt blocks at an antique shop  and determined it would be an interesting challenge to finished the project. The quilt blocks were accompanied by a newspaper clipping that contained a pattern. The quilter who had begun the quilt had finished the pieced blocks but had not gotten around to the embroidery portion of the quilt. After we embroidery the quilts blocks I pieced the remainder of the quilt on my treadle showing machine. The final step was to tie the quilt and that was finished this last weekend. The project got me thinking a little bit about the history and legacy of quilt making…

Quilts have a long and fascinating part of American history. Families have snuggled beneath quilts as they read inspiring stories of adventure, risk, and kingdom building. Quilts traveled in covered wagons as the pioneer families settled the frontiers. Every little scrap of fabric to be found was sewn into quilts and blankets by the resourceful women during the War Between the States. Quilts also were sewn from scraps left over from the famed “Flower Sack” dresses of the Depression era of the 1930’s. Quilts express the wonderful ideas of multigenerational thinking and  resourcefulness. Therefore, they can remind us of our tasks of dominion under Jesus Christ and our heritage as Christians. They also brighten our home and serve the practical purposes of warmth and comfort.

I have quilts that were made for me by my great-grandmother and my grandmother. They remind me of my own heritage, and remind me of the Providence of God, and His kindness towards me. I’d like leave a similar legacy for my own children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren (should the Lord bless me with them): I’d like to pass down to them a legacy of resourcefulness and Christ-centered womanhood.

 

I have had a number of friends inquire about how I make my skirts. I thought I’d share this online in the hopes that other people might find it helpful. This will explain (hopefully…) how to make a nice denim skirt out of two pairs of jeans.

To begin you’ll need two pairs of jeans (if you want a fuller skirt boot cut jeans work well) the size that you want your skirt.

To begin rip out the inside seem of both pair of pants:

Now take  the  first pair of jeans and cut the legs off right below the pockets:

With the second pair of jeans rip-out the front and back seam part way up:

Take one of the leg pieces from the first pair of jeans and tuck it inside the second pair of jeans like this:

Turn the raw edge of the second pair of jeans to the inside of the skirt:

Line up the hem line of  the second pair of jeans and leg piece from the first pair and pin it in place:

Pin the middle back seam of the second pair of jeans to the middle seam of the legs piece from the first pair of jeans:


Make sure that the edge lies smoothly then pin the rest of it in place like so:

When pinned the the inside of the skirt should look like this:

Next sew very closely to the folded edge on the outside of the second jeans:

It should look like this when it is sewn:

Next turn the skirt inside out and trim off the excess fabric near the seam:

Follow the same steps for the front of the skirt:

Once both sides of the skirt are finished trim off the hem edge of the skirt:

Finally hem the skirt to the desired length:

Made from Irish Chain quilt in a day book.

Made from Irish Chain quilt in a day book. Machine Quilted.

1860's production quilt in process at a Civil War Reenactment.

1860’s production quilt in process at a Civil War Reenactment.

The Finished 1860’s reproduction quilt. Hand-quilted – mostly at Reenactments.

I made one Log Cabin Baby Quilt from Reproduction fabrics. I do not have a picture of that quilt. However I have pictures of all the other quilts I made in 2010.

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Un-even nine patch quilt made from 1806’s reproduction cottons. Hand Quilts.

Lucky Star Quilt. Made mostly from 1860’s Reproduction Cottons. Hand Quilted.

 

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Embroidered the Cowboy-dogs by hand and sewed the blocks into a quilt top. Tied it together.

Made from scraps from my Grandma Lou - mostly from clothes she made me. Used them to make a disappearing nine-patch quilt. First quilt that I quilted on a Long-arm.

Made from scraps from my Grandma Lou – mostly from clothes she made me. Used them to make a disappearing nine-patch quilt. First quilt that I quilted on a Long-arm.

My first quilt - finished in 2008. Made as a project for 4-H.

My first quilt – finished in 2007 or 2008. Made as a project for 4-H.

My second quilt - A Crazy quilt made primarily from Roy Rogers fabrics. Did this one for hire in 2008.

The second quilt I started – but if I remember correctly it was the first one I finished. Made primarily from Roy Rogers fabrics. Was tied, and was made in 2007.

The Quilt top was made by my Grandma Lou at my request. I hand quilted the entire quilt top. Was the first hand quilted top that I finished on my own. Made in 2007 or 2008.

The Quilt top was made by my Grandma Lou at my request. I hand quilted the entire quilt top. Was the first hand quilted top that I finished on my own. Made in 2007 or 2008.

 

Southern Belle Quilt. I made this one off a quilt made by my great-grandmother in the 70's It's completely different colors but I traced the design off her quilt. My first attempt at applique - and it wasn't a very good attempt.

Southern Belle Quilt. I made this one off a quilt made by my great-grandmother in the 70’s It’s completely different colors but I traced the design off her quilt. My first attempt at applique – and it wasn’t a very good attempt. Made in 2008 – I think.

Made in August 2009 for my grandma Evonne who was in the nursing home. Machine quilted.

Made in August 2009 for my grandma Evonne who was in the nursing home. Machine quilted.

Little Baby Quilt I made to put away in my hope-chest. Hand quilted.

Little Baby Quilt I made to put away in my hope-chest. Hand quilted.

Made three of these quilts. One for each of my brothers and one for myself. Long-armed them all at Quilter's Dream.

Made three of these quilts. One for each of my brothers and one for myself. Long-armed them all at Quilter’s Dream.

Kool Kats Kwilt patterned. My grandma made one and I decided I liked it and wanted to make one for my first-cousin once removed; who likes Cats. finished in November of 2009

Kool Kats Kwilt patterned. My grandma made one and I decided I liked it and wanted to make one for my first-cousin once removed; who likes Cats. finished in November of 2009

I have been thinking for some time that it would be fun to have a purse with the Confederate battle flag on it. I could only find one online for purchase and it was a little more in price than I really wanted to spend. Instead, I decided I’d make one. I sewed the strips of fabric together for the main part of the battle flag and then hand embroidered the stars onto the flag. The opposite side of the purse is made to look like the “Bonnie Blue” that was so loved by the Confederates. I simply appliquéd a white star in the middle of the blue fabric.

I made this doll dress as a gift for a little girl in Texas. It’s one of the fancier dresses I have made! I made it from Felicity’s Christmas Dress pattern here.

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