One of the significant events my quilting adventure this year was learning to paper piece! I stumbled upon a garden quilt while looking through back issues of my grandma’s quilt magazines. It was for a wall hanging so I doubled the size of the pattern and my neighbor taught me to paper piece. So now let the paper piecing adventures begin!

The first three pieces.

The first three pieces.

More blocks sewn together!

More blocks sewn together!

An "oops" moment.

An “oops” moment.

All the lovely blocks starting to come together.

All the lovely blocks starting to come together.

IMG_20141104_125750

The top!

IMG_20141111_075910

All finished. Quilt on the long-arm.

IMG_20140906_113604

Blue Bird

Robin

Robin

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

Wren

Wren

Cardinal

Cardinal

Gold Finch

Gold Finch

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Finished in August 2014.

IMG_20140506_165901

I purchased this Confederate General’s panel at our local quilt club’s show in the spring of 2014 and quickly set into motion my plans to make a quilt top from it. The first step was to make a large star from the main fabrics.

Working on the blocks.

Working on the blocks.

IMG_20140724_094238

When chain piecing doesn’t go well!

The Confederate Quilt on my neighbor's long-arm.

The Confederate Quilt on my neighbor’s long-arm.

Finished quilt project. My own quilt design finally completed.

Finished quilt project. My own quilt design finally completed.

What it looks like on my bed.

What it looks like on my bed.

Over the winter while finishing up my history degree I did a research project on my families genealogy. The family I research was the Charles Squire family. His wife Maria Alzina Finch (Squire) was born in Belle Plain, Minnesota in 1841. She married Charles Squire in April 16, 1864. Charles and Maria settles down on a farm in Scott County, Minnesota in 1865 after Charles returned from the War. They moved to Glenwood, Pope County, Minnesota in 1882. Maria spent the rest of her life there until her own death on October 6, 1924.

In July my parents and I visited the Pope County Historical society and found in the archives a quilt top made my Maria Squire. I was able to have a close look at the quilt and take pictures of it. The Quilt top was made by my Great-Great-Great-Grandmother. :)

IMG_20140726_132033 IMG_20140726_132324 IMG_20140726_132336 IMG_20140726_132406

 

Along with the Adoniram Judson outfit that I made and the 1930’s quilt that I completed I made finished the following projects:

I made a set of tea-pot embroidered towels for a wedding gift:

IMG_20131114_173348

I made a set of 7 tea-pot embroidered towels for a wedding gift.

IMG_20131214_124351

I also got asked to make a replica of the American Girl Doll Molly’s Christmas dress. This was my replica.

IMG_20131214_124049

Replica of the American girl doll Emily’s Christmas Dress.

This quilt top was started by my Grandma Lou but she never finished it before she died. I finished to give as a present to my cousin's  baby boy. Machine Quilted. Finished in November 2013

This quilt top was started by my Grandma Lou but she never finished it before she died. I finished to give as a present to my cousin’s baby boy. Machine Quilted. Finished in November 2013

My Brother decided to reenact Adoniram Judson. He ask me to sew him an outfit styled after the regency area – which I happily agreed to do. Here are pictures of the completed outfit:

Finished 1930’s quilt.

This past weekend my cousin and I had the opportunity to finished a quilt that was begun in the 1930s. We purchased the quilt blocks at an antique shop  and determined it would be an interesting challenge to finished the project. The quilt blocks were accompanied by a newspaper clipping that contained a pattern. The quilter who had begun the quilt had finished the pieced blocks but had not gotten around to the embroidery portion of the quilt. After we embroidery the quilts blocks I pieced the remainder of the quilt on my treadle showing machine. The final step was to tie the quilt and that was finished this last weekend. The project got me thinking a little bit about the history and legacy of quilt making…

Quilts have a long and fascinating part of American history. Families have snuggled beneath quilts as they read inspiring stories of adventure, risk, and kingdom building. Quilts traveled in covered wagons as the pioneer families settled the frontiers. Every little scrap of fabric to be found was sewn into quilts and blankets by the resourceful women during the War Between the States. Quilts also were sewn from scraps left over from the famed “Flower Sack” dresses of the Depression era of the 1930’s. Quilts express the wonderful ideas of multigenerational thinking and  resourcefulness. Therefore, they can remind us of our tasks of dominion under Jesus Christ and our heritage as Christians. They also brighten our home and serve the practical purposes of warmth and comfort.

I have quilts that were made for me by my great-grandmother and my grandmother. They remind me of my own heritage, and remind me of the Providence of God, and His kindness towards me. I’d like leave a similar legacy for my own children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren (should the Lord bless me with them): I’d like to pass down to them a legacy of resourcefulness and Christ-centered womanhood.

 

I have had a number of friends inquire about how I make my skirts. I thought I’d share this online in the hopes that other people might find it helpful. This will explain (hopefully…) how to make a nice denim skirt out of two pairs of jeans.

To begin you’ll need two pairs of jeans (if you want a fuller skirt boot cut jeans work well) the size that you want your skirt.

To begin rip out the inside seem of both pair of pants:

Now take  the  first pair of jeans and cut the legs off right below the pockets:

With the second pair of jeans rip-out the front and back seam part way up:

Take one of the leg pieces from the first pair of jeans and tuck it inside the second pair of jeans like this:

Turn the raw edge of the second pair of jeans to the inside of the skirt:

Line up the hem line of  the second pair of jeans and leg piece from the first pair and pin it in place:

Pin the middle back seam of the second pair of jeans to the middle seam of the legs piece from the first pair of jeans:


Make sure that the edge lies smoothly then pin the rest of it in place like so:

When pinned the the inside of the skirt should look like this:

Next sew very closely to the folded edge on the outside of the second jeans:

It should look like this when it is sewn:

Next turn the skirt inside out and trim off the excess fabric near the seam:

Follow the same steps for the front of the skirt:

Once both sides of the skirt are finished trim off the hem edge of the skirt:

Finally hem the skirt to the desired length:

Made from Irish Chain quilt in a day book.

Made from Irish Chain quilt in a day book. Machine Quilted.

1860's production quilt in process at a Civil War Reenactment.

1860’s production quilt in process at a Civil War Reenactment.

The Finished 1860’s reproduction quilt. Hand-quilted – mostly at Reenactments.

I made one Log Cabin Baby Quilt from Reproduction fabrics. I do not have a picture of that quilt. However I have pictures of all the other quilts I made in 2010.

74759_134185250065643_1009413173_n

Un-even nine patch quilt made from 1806’s reproduction cottons. Hand Quilts.

Lucky Star Quilt. Made mostly from 1860’s Reproduction Cottons. Hand Quilted.

 

PAGE TOP